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VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

An American Turning Point: The Civil War

From 1861 to 1865 Virginia stood at the center of a military and social revolution. How we definefreedom, liberty, patriotism, and nation today is directly related to the diverse experiences of theindividuals who participated in the Civil War. This program will discuss various aspects of the Civil War, including life on the battlefield, life onthe home front, the roles of medicine and technology in the Civil War, and the parts that AfricanAmericans, American Indians, women, and children played in the war.

More Information   $125.00


From Civil War to Civil Rights: The African American Experience in Virginia (Part 2)

Emancipation and the end of the Civil War brought promises of equality for African Americans inVirginia and throughout the South. It took the better part of a century for those promises to beginto be realized. This program will identify and examine the effects of segregation and Jim Crowon life in Virginia for whites, African Americans, and American Indians. Participants will alsodiscuss the social and political events in Virginia linked to desegregation and Massive Resistanceand their relationship to national history.

More Information   $125.00


From Jamestown to Revolution: Virginia in the Colonial Era

What happened between 1607 and 1763 in Virginia? Through the use of replica artifacts, pictures, maps, and other primary sources, this program will study how and why Jamestown was the first permanent settlement in Virginia, how Williamsburg was chosen as the first capital city, the beginnings of government, slavery versus indentured servitude, and how colonial Virginians lived in their day-to-day lives.The Virginia Historical Society offers programs at a 50% discount for schools located within the state of Virginia

More Information   $125.00


Pocahontas and the Powhatan Indians

Participants will learn about what life was like for Woodland Indians by examining the Algonquian speaking Powhatansin Virginia before the first English settlers made it their home. The Powhatans serve as an excellentexample of Woodland Indian culture that dominated the eastern United States prior to theEuropean contract. This program will feature a discussion about Pocahontas and the mythsassociated with her life. Much of what historians now know about her and the Indians we call "thePowhatans" is derived from English sources, as the Powhatans had no written language. Thepresenter will examine at the reliability of these English sources in a discussion of what mysteriesstill remain about these people.

More Information   $125.00


Rebuilding America: Reconstruction

After the Civil War, Virginians eagerly embraced economic development and technologicalchange while resisting political and social change. Indeed, as Virginia moved forward in manyways and living standards improved, society was rigidly segregated by race. This programexamines the ways in which Virginians and other former Confederates dealt with rebuilding andreunification after the Civil War. Particular attention is paid to the impacts of the 13th, 14th, and15th amendments, the origins of Jim Crow, and other steps taken to disenfranchise AfricanAmericans and poor whites.

More Information   $125.00


Saving Private Scott

Sometime on September 17, 1862, Private Benjamin I. Scott of the 18th Virginia Infantry waskilled at the battle of Antietam. However, his fate remained unknown as his body was one ofalmost 300,000 that remained unidentified in the Civil War. In this program, you will explorea mother's agonizing search for her missing son as revealed in the letters of Confederate GeneralRobert E. Lee, Union General Joseph Hooker, and a number of other Union and Confederateofficers as they tried to determine Private Scott's fate. The story of Private Scott has beenpublished recently in the Pulitzer Prize-winning work, This Republic of Suffering.

More Information   $125.00


Sick Call! : Civil War Diseases, Hospitals, and Medicine

More soldiers died during the American Civil War from diseases than from battle wounds. What were the most common diseases, and how did doctors treat them? This program examines doctors, nurses, and patients in both the North and South and how they dealt with sickness and injury. Audience will use an interactive program to help diagnose a sick patient and treat them for their ailment while also learning how surgeons completed war-time amputations.

More Information   $125.00


Slavery and Emancipation: The African American Experience in Virginia (Part 1)

This program examines the African American experience in Virginia from the earliest sighting ofAfricans in Virginia in 1619, through the seventeenth century beginnings of enslavement toemancipation. In addition to the history of the institution, this program will bring a focus onAfrican cultural traditions like music, family celebrations, and foodways; students will learn someof the many African and African American responses to slavery, including Nat Turners rebellion,the Underground Railroad, and John Browns raid on Harpers Ferry

More Information   $125.00


The Making of America: Expansion, Reform and the Westward Movement

While Virginia was establishing her claim to being the Mother of Presidents, nearly a millionVirginians left the state between the Revolutionary and American Civil wars. This programexamines the contributions of Virginians to the new Republic (Constitution, Bill of Rights, etc) aswell as the nineteenth-century movement of Virginians to the West and their contributions tosettling the American frontier. Using primary sources from Virginians who traveled west, alongwith reproductions of objects that might have been found on a settler's Conestoga wagon,students interpret the great migration from Virginia in the decades before the Civil War. Thisprogram also looks at the movement of African Americans during the time period, both via slavetrade and the Underground Railroad.

More Information   $125.00


The Pursuit of Liberty: On the Road to Revolution

In 1763 Virginia stood as one of the central colonies in Great Britain's empire. Twenty years laterthe Treaty of Paris was signed, ending a military and social revolution. Our understanding offreedom, liberty, patriotism, and nation today is directly related to the roles patriotic colonistsplayed in establishing American independence. This program examines the economic and government structure of life in the colonies, explores the impacts of British taxes and tariffs on the colonials, and investigates the roles of Virginians indeclaring independence and waging the Revolutionary War. The audience will examine specificindividuals and situations to promote an understanding of the Revolutionary experiences of manyof our Founding Fathers. Famous Virginians such as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, JamesMadison, and George Mason will be discussed as well as lesser known individuals like Anna MariaLane and James Lafayette.

More Information   $125.00


Who held the First Thanksgiving... And What Was It?

Most agricultural societies developed prayers of thanks and ceremonies to celebrate harvests and other special occasions, so what do we mean when we ask, who held the first Thanksgiving? This program will examine the origin of the holiday, from Native American harvest ceremonies to the competing claims of who had the first ranging from the Spanish in Florida, to the English in Virginia, and of course, the Pilgrims at Plymouth Plantation. From the proclamations of George Washington to Abraham Lincoln establishing it as a national holiday we will examine how various traditions that were often regional in nature coalesced to form the holiday now celebrated throughout the United States. (Will adjust the price to work with multiple centers)

More Information   $125.00