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Saturday, Apr. 11th 2015

HISTORY CONNECTS

Back to the Fifties - Behind the American Dream

The 1950s are often thought of as a decade of progress and prosperity for all Americans. In Back to the Fifties: Behind the American Dream, we’ll unveil and discuss the complex social issues everyday people faced in the 1950s and how these issues continue to affect present day society.

Request this program   $100.00


Finding the "Real" Pocahontas

The study of Pocahontas is an excellent exercise testing the strength of primary versus secondary sources. Factually we know very little about Pocahontas. These facts are often interwoven with myth and legend surrounding her life. Depictions of Pocahontas throughout time can reveal as much about the time they were created as they do about the Indian "princess". $125

Request this program   $125.00


From Jamestown to Revolution: Virginia in the Colonial Era

What happened between 1607 and 1763 in Virginia? Through the use of replica artifacts, pictures, maps, and other primary sources, this program will study how and why Jamestown was the first permanent settlement in Virginia, how Williamsburg was chosen as the first capital city, the beginnings of government, slavery versus indentured servitude, and how colonial Virginians lived in their day-to-day lives. 125.00

Request this program   $125.00


Humor with Edge: Exploring Political Cartoons

HistoryConnects from the Virginia Museum of History and Culture For more than two centuries, whenever there has been a debate in the United States, political cartoons have taken part, and in some cases, pushed the debate to its limits. Analyzing a political cartoon can lead to a deeper understanding of the issues addressed by the cartoon, as well as the historical context from which the issues arose.

Request this program   $125.00


John Robertson Maben & the Search for California Gold!

In 1849, John Robertson Maben traveled to California in search of gold. In a series of thirteen letters, Maben describes his travels to his wife, Sarah. These letters are especially vivid as Maben was witness to events both momentous and mundane. He wrote of the cholera epidemic of 1849, the great St. Louis fire that same year, and the excitement and brutality of the California gold fields. In this program, students will join Maben on his journey, interpreting his letters, tracing his travels on a nineteenth-century map, and examining the landscape. $125

Request this program   $125.00


Pocahontas and the Powhatan Indians

Using primary sources as well as replica artifacts created by Mattaponi Indians, students will learn about what life was like for Woodland Indians by examining the Algonquian speaking Powhatans in Virginia before the first English settlers made it their home. $125

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Rebuilding America: Reconstruction and Jim Crow

After the Civil War, Virginians eagerly embraced economic development and technological change while resisting political and social change. Indeed, as Virginia moved forward in many ways and living standards improved, society was rigidly segregated by race. This program examines the ways in which Virginians and other former Confederates dealt with rebuilding and reunification after the Civil War. Particular attention is paid to the impacts of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments, the origins of Jim Crow, and other steps taken to disenfranchise African Americans and poor whites. $125.00

Request this program   $125.00


Sick Call!: Civil War Diseases, Hospitals, and Medicine

More soldiers died during the American Civil War from diseases than from battle wounds. What were the most common diseases, and how did doctors treat them? This program examines doctors, nurses, and patients in both the North and South and how they dealt with sickness and injury. Students will use an interactive program to help diagnose a sick patient and treat them for their ailment while also learning how surgeons completed war-time amputations.

Request this program   $125.00


The Civil War: An American Turning Point

From 1861 to 1865 the country was in a military and social revolution. How we define freedom, liberty, patriotism, and nation today is directly related to the diverse experiences of the individuals who participated in the Civil War. $125

Request this program   $125.00


The Civil War: An American Turning Point

From 1861 to 1865 the country was in a military and social revolution. How we define freedom, liberty, patriotism, and nation today is directly related to the diverse experiences of the individuals who participated in the Civil War. This program will discuss various aspects of the Civil War, including life on the battlefield, life on the home front, the roles of medicine and technology in the Civil War, and the parts that African Americans, American Indians, women, and children played in the war. Students will explore the everyday experience of a Civil War soldier, focusing on aspects of camp life such as clothing, food, and letters from home. From the perspective of those who fought, students will gain insight into the war and its consequences as they: -investigate the trials and hardships of a Civil War soldier -examine similarities and differences of equipment used by the Union and Confederate soldiers -draw their own conclusions of what it may have been like to carry these items during the four seasons of the year without modern transportation -examine primary and secondary sources of objects and letters -discuss the effect the war had on Virginians and the country -explore the contributions made by women, slaves and children, whether they worked side by side with the soldiers or helped to maintain the home front while the men were away

Request this program   $125.00


The Making of America: Expansion, Reform, & the Westward Movement

While Virginia was establishing her claim to being “the Mother of Presidents”, nearly a million Virginians left the state between the Revolutionary and American Civil wars. This program examines the contributions of Virginians to the new Republic (Constitution, Bill of Rights, etc) as well as the nineteenth-century movement of Virginians to the West and their contributions to settling the American frontier. Using primary sources from Virginians who traveled west, along with reproductions of objects that might have been found on a settler's Conestoga wagon, students interpret the great migration from Virginia in the decades before the Civil War. This program also looks at the movement of African Americans during the time period, both via slave trade and the Underground Railroad $125

Request this program   $125.00


The Old Dominion: All About Virginia

An interactive fun, fast-paced tour of Virginia! Discover how land, people, and ideas converge to create "The Mother of Presidents." Using modern and historic maps, students will examine industry, topography, official Virginia state symbols and more. Participants will also learn geography basics, including locating Virginia and its bordering states on maps of the United States, and locating and describing Virginia's five geographic regions.

Request this program   $100.00


The Pursuit of Liberty: the Revolutionary War and the Founding of America

Virginians played an essential role in the creation of the new American nation. From actions during and following the American Revolution to ideas and documents that established the new country, Virginians were involved at every point. During this program students will learn more about the lives of Virginia's founding fathers, such as George Washington, Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Mason, while also examining some of the most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence, the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and the United States Constitution $125

Request this program   $125.00



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